Nathan Alspaugh

 

Source: SEOSignalsLab

Pick His Brain!

I’d like to introduce one of our members, Nathan Alspaugh, for our next ‘Pick His Brain’ session and I want to thank him for the participation.

Alex is a UI/UX designer with rich experience ranging from application design to landing pages.

If your website has traffic but isn’t converting, you need to talk to this guy.

We all know traffic alone isn’t enough. It’s time to pick his brain.

Load up the thread with your questions and he’ll answer whenever he is available.

Here are the rules.

1) I’ll let the thread go on until he asks me to stop. Theoretically, this thread can continue until bitcoin value goes to zero.

2) Please, no snarky remarks. I will not tolerate any intentional negativity. We are here to learn from each other’s success and strategies.

3) Please do not PM him and bother him. If you have a private question, ask for his permission on this thread when appropriate.

#PickHisBrain

What are the most important elements when you design a landing page?

This is a great question!

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So there’s typically a standard answer that rings true but I’ll also go into another way of thinking about it.

So having a really good heading that’s legible and captivating combined with a really awesome CTA are essential.

Runner ups are imagery and appropriate color choices.

Now that is kind of the standard answer but I think a really good way of thinking about things when designing landing pages is likening it to how a screenwriter thinks about a scene in a movie.

If you think about a scene in a movie you begin to think about the setting such as is it outside or inside, what season is it?

What lighting would be appropriate, etc. You should think the same way when selecting the elements to go on your landing page.

Is the hero background image adding to the overall feeling you’re trying to convey? Are these colors going to stir an emotion that I intended.

So having strong basics and then thinking about it like that should set you up for a good outcome.

What metrics or tools do you use?

For larger projects, I’ve seen hot jar to help measure usability.

And for prototyping I use invision.

I recommend before putting the work into getting your landing page out there, create a prototype with hotspots and test before launching.

That way you can improve on it before launch.

What was your favorite project?

My favorite project so far was a marketing site for an online coding boot camp.

It was awesome because they let the designers be as creative as possible.

I can’t release the name but when they launch I’ll be sure to link to it here.

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What are some quick wins people can implement right away?

A quick win is to remove an element. Totally sounds counter intuitive, right?

But by trying to be judicious about what to remove.

You begin to think about the importance of each element and the total composition in a different light.

Do you have a template for the best converting landing page?

I don’t specifically have a template, as the projects I work vary too much.

But in my freelancing days I’ve seen this setup, for some reason, seem to convert really well for books.

It had a mockup of the book to the left with some checkmark bullet points outlining whatever the books features were and then a sign up form to the right.

And under that some testimonials. Don’t know why, but that seemed to do well.

What are some of the easiest fixes you implement on affiliate sites that sell physical products(amazon)?

Putting in an effort to highlight the product in an aesthetically pleasing way can totally improve conversions by sparking the user’s interest even more with it before deciding to buy.

Check out the product description of this as a reference.

Maybe not my cup of tea design wise but the way they break the product down is good.

So taking that principle on your affiliates pages and you could see an improvement. https://www.amazon.com/…/ref=psdc_2407781011_t1_B074ZNLM9J

Can you give me top recommendation for my landing pages in terms of UI… they all have the same format look and feel as https://techdevice.repair/gaming-systems/playstation-4 .

My top ranking page.

Thanks for the question! So my initial impression of this page is that it’s a bit word-heavy.

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A safe assumption to make is users are not actually inclined to read.

So by consolidating content and making the very most important things stand out in headings would be a good first step.

Making the hero taller and allowing more room to breathe for the content would be a good idea.

This would also allow the background to be more captivating. These are some good places to start.

What are common mistakes you see on landing pages?

Typically companies really love to talk about themselves instead of talking about how they can actually help the user.

This is common with the “do-it-yourself” kind of people.

Is creative design against conversion rates? That means… less standard things may have lower conversion rates?

This is something I continue to roll-over within my head.

I’ve seen really crappy looking pages convert like crazy and really aesthetically pleasing one’s flop.

This goes to show that it’s not just looks, but strategy that ultimately will drive conversions.

But I, like you have grown sick of looking at the same old, same old that’s out there.

 

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